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Monthly Archives: June 2014

RAI Provides Electrical Services For Community’s First Police K9 Kennel

On June 13, 2014 representatives from Ray Angelini, Inc. (RAI) joined local officials to celebrate at the official ribbon cutting for the new Washington Township (WT) Police K9 Kennel at police headquarters, 1 McClure Drive.  RAI provided the electrical services for the kennel and coordinated with all contractors on the project, which was completed in three months. C. Amodie Co., Inc. of Bensalem, PA donated the excavating and Diversified Lighting of Warminster, PA, donated the lighting fixtures.  The kennel is the first housing for K9s in the township.  The facility will house up to five dogs.

WT K9 Kennel opening
Celebrating the grand opening of the new Washington Township (WT) Police K9 Kennel at police headquarters, 1 McClure Drive, during the June 13, 2014 Ribbon Cutting are (from l to r):  WT Lt. Pat Gurscik, WT Councilman Scott Newman, WT Mayor Barbara Wallace, RAI Operations Director Jason Kaplan, RAI Director of Electrical Systems Design Joe Camarota, RAI Estimator/Project Manager Gary Cheeseman, and RAI Project Executive Darren Davis.
 
WT K9 Kennel opening - Link
WT Police Officer Hice and his K9 partner “Link,” one of five dogs that will have a new home in the WT K9 Kennel.

Protecting Workers from Heat Stress

Heat Illness
Exposure to heat can cause illness and death. The most serious heat illness is heat stroke. Other heat illnesses, such as heat exhaustion, heat cramps and heat rash, should also be avoided.

There are precautions your employer should take any time temperatures are high and the job involves physical work.

Risk Factors for Heat Illness
• High temperature and humidity, direct sun exposure, no breeze or wind
• Low liquid intake
• Heavy physical labor
• Waterproof clothing
• No recent exposure to hot workplaces

Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion
• Headache, dizziness, or fainting
• Weakness and wet skin
• Irritability or confusion
• Thirst, nausea, or vomiting

Symptoms of Heat Stroke
• May be confused, unable to think clearly, pass out, collapse, or have seizures (fits)
• May stop sweating

To Prevent Heat Illness, Your Employer Should
• Provide training about the hazards leading to heat stress and how to prevent them.
• Provide a lot of cool water to workers close to the work area. At least one pint of water per hour is needed.

SOURCE:
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
U.S. Department of Labor
www.osha.gov
(800) 321-OSHA (6742)

Safety In The Sun

It is 93 million miles away, and life would not exist without it. Its energy moves the winds, permits life-giving rains to develop and fall, and is the engine behind plant growth, which supports the food chain and oxygen cycle. In ways beyond measure, we depend on this nearby star. Yet foolish exposure to sunlight can be harmful to human health. Following are some of the things to think about when you spend significant time outdoors.

  1. Ultraviolet rays can damage the eye’s sensitive retina and cornea. Long-term exposure can cause cataracts, which can lead to permanent blindness or other vision problems.
  2. Skin cancer is usually related to overexposure to the sun. It is one of the most common forms of cancer in the U.S., and becoming more common. About 600,000 cases are diagnosed annually, and about 6,700 people die every year from melanoma, the most serious skin cancer.

Skin cancer is not associated with a single event, like painful sunburn, but is the product of long-term (and therefore “hidden”) exposure. Protection from excessive exposure to the sun is simple, commonsense, and effective in avoiding later health problems. Be safety savvy and do the following:

  • Wear protective clothing, including a hat and proper sunglasses. Remember that poor grade sunglasses are worse than none at all.
  • Wear proper sunscreen (SPF rating of at least 15). But don’t use these products as a crutch. Instead, limit your exposure to the sun, even if you are wearing the proper clothes and sunscreen.
  • See your doctor if you notice a new growth, mole, or discoloration, or a sudden change in an existing mole. Detection of skin cancer is the first step for successful treatment.

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