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Monthly Archives: January 2016

RAI receives Contractor Safety Excellence Award

For the seventh year in a row, RAI becomes the recipient of the 2015 DuPont Contractor Safety Excellence Award, for outstanding safety, health and environmental performance.

“Well Done!! Congratulations to all employees for your continued focus. The numerous awards we have received is a distinction that sets us apart and accomplishes our goals for our client and ourselves.”
—Ray Angelini, Founder and President, Ray Angelini, Inc.

2015 DuPont Award

Preventing Slips on Snow and Ice

To prevent slips, trips, and falls, walking surfaces should be cleared of snow and ice, and deicer spread, as quickly as possible after a winter storm. In addition, the following precautions help reduce the likelihood of injuries:

Wear proper footwear when walking on snow or ice is unavoidable, because it is especially treacherous. A pair of insulated and water-resistant boots with good rubber treads is a must for walking during or after a winter storm. Keeping a pair of rubber over-shoes with good treads which fit over your street shoes is a good idea during the winter months.

Take short steps and walk at a slower pace so you can react quickly to a change in traction, when walking on an icy or snow-covered walkway.

Winter Driving—Stay Safe!

Although you cannot control roadway conditions, you can use safe driving behavior by ensuring that you: recognize the hazards of winter weather driving, (e.g., driving on snow/ice covered roads); are properly trained for driving in winter weather conditions; and are licensed (as applicable) for the vehicles you operate. For information about driving safely during winter, visit OSHA’s Safe Winter Driving page.

If you are an employer, be sure to set and enforce driver safety policies for your employees. Also, implement an effective maintenance program for all vehicles and mechanized equipment that your workers are required to operate. Learn more at: Motor Vehicle Safety (OSHA Safety and Health Topics Page).

Before hitting the road, it is a good idea to inspect the following systems on your vehicle(s) to determine proper operating conditions:

  • Brakes: Brakes should provide even and balanced braking. Also check that brake fluid is at the proper level.
  • Cooling System: Ensure a mixture of 50/50 antifreeze and water in the cooling system at the proper level.
  • Electrical System: Check the ignition system and make sure that the battery is fully charged and that the connections are clean. Check that the alternator belt is in good condition with proper tension.
  • Engine: Inspect all engine systems.
  • Exhaust System: Check exhaust for leaks and that all clamps and hangers are snug.
  • Tires: Check for proper tread depth and no signs of damage or uneven wear. Check for accurate tire inflation.
  • Oil: Check oil is at proper level.
  • Visibility Systems: Inspect all exterior lights, defrosters (windshield and rear window), and wipers. Install winter windshield wipers.

An emergency kit with the following items is recommended for any vehicle:

  • Cellphone or two-way radio
  • Windshield ice scraper
  • Snow brush
  • Flashlight with extra batteries
  • Shovel
  • Tow chain
  • Traction aids (bag of sand or cat litter)
  • Emergency flares
  • Jumper cables
  • Snacks
  • Water
  • Road maps
  • Blankets, change of clothes

Whether you are responsible for driving a company-owned vehicle or you drive your own vehicle, take these winter driving tips seriously to help keep yourself as well as others safe this season.

Space Heater Safety

Heating equipment is the second leading cause of home fires in the United States. More than 65,000 home fires are attributed to heating equipment each year. These fires result in hundreds of deaths, thousands of injuries, and millions of dollars in property damage.

Portable electric space heaters can be a convenient source of supplemental heat for your home in cold weather. Unfortunately, they can pose significant fire and electric shock hazards if not used properly. Fire and electrical hazards can be caused by space heaters without adequate safety features, space heaters placed near combustibles, or space heaters that are improperly plugged in.

Safety should always be a top consideration when using space heaters. Here are some tips for keeping your home safe and warm when it’s cold outside:

  • Make sure your space heater has the label showing that it is listed by a recognized testing laboratory.
  • Before using any space heater, read the manufacturer’s instructions and warning labels carefully.
  • Inspect heaters for cracked or broken plugs or loose connections before each use. If frayed, worn or damaged, do not use the heater.
  • Never leave a space heater unattended. Turn it off when you’re leaving a room or going to sleep, and don’t let pets or children play close to a space heater.
  • Space heaters are only meant to provide supplemental heat and should never be used to warm bedding, cook food, dry clothing or thaw pipes.
  • Install smoke alarms on every floor of your home and outside all sleeping areas and test them once a month.
  • Proper placement of space heaters is critical. Heaters must be kept at least three feet away from anything that can burn, including papers, clothing and rugs.
  • Locate space heaters out of high traffic areas and doorways where they may pose a tripping hazard.
  • Plug space heaters directly into a wall outlet. Do not use an extension cord or power strip, which could overheat and result in a fire. Do not plug any other electrical devices into the same outlet as the heater.
  • Place space heaters on level, flat surfaces. Never place heaters on cabinets, tables, furniture, or carpet, which can overheat and start a fire.
  • Always unplug and safely store the heater when it is not in use.
Source:  Space Heater Safety

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